Skip to main content
Book Online


Book Online
Book Exam
Map
Call Us
Menu
Hero_image-2
Home » contact lens » Are Contacts Hard To Put In?

Are Contacts Hard To Put In?

Typically, it’s easy to put fitted contacts into your eye and of course remove them when you need to. It just takes patience and practice.

If Kids Can Use Them, So Can Adults

Many parents are concerned about allowing their kids to wear contacts when their children show an interest in wearing contacts. However, according to research, most kids do well once they learn how to properly care for and handle their contacts and they find it easy to put them in and take them out.

In recent studies, 84 children aged 8 to 12, and 85 teens who were 13 to 17, were all fitted with contact lenses for the very first time. The majority of these younger children were able to master the art of putting them in and removing them. Also, the 83 percent of the pre-teens and 90 percent of the teens stated that they were easy to use and take care of.

All the parents in the study were in agreement. By the end of the study, 96 percent of the parents in the pre-teen group, and 89 percent of the parents in the teen group were in agreement with the statement that their children were able to demonstrate the responsibility that it takes to wear contact lenses and to properly care for them.

Good fitting will ensure that the contacts aren’t hard to put into the eye. Regardless of whether you’re a parent of a child wearing contacts, or an adult who is trying them for the first time, a comprehensive eye exam will help the doctor to make sure that they’re going to fit well by the measurements that they’re going to take. They will then choose the best fitting contact for your specific needs or for your child’s specific needs.

The doctor will measure the amount of space between the upper and lower lids when the eyes are open normally.

If there is limited space (many Asians or those who have deep set eyes struggle with this), the doctor may select a soft lens that has a small diameter to make it easy to insert and remove the contacts.

If there is trouble in handling the contacts, it’s because the person is likely blinking before the lenses touch the eye. Your eye doctor or the optician will give suggestions to help you become more comfortable in placing the contacts into your eyes and removing them from your eyes.

Wash your hands well.

Always look into the mirror and open the eyes widely. Touch the whites of your eyes with your pad of your finger and don’t blink.

Use the same technique applying the contacts and put it on the tip of your finger as you place it into your eye. Allow your finger to remain in your eye for a second or two before you remove it.

It will take some practice; however, you’ll master the skill in time. Once you master the skill, it becomes easier and easier.

If you’re still struggling, the eye doctor may suggest gas permeable lenses instead. Rigid lenses take more getting used to; however, they’re smaller than soft contacts, and many find them far easier to place in the eye.

Regardless of which you select, the gas permeable lenses or the rigid gas lenses don’t give up. If you’re struggling, walk away for a few minutes and try again later.

Each successful attempt will make it easier the next time. Be patient and practice and soon you’ll be doing it easily every time. It will quickly become second nature to you, and you’ll have mastered the technique.